Thinkware F750 review

img_0582

This is my second dashcam, after a “no-brand” one bought off Amazon a couple of years back stopped working. I then went looking for the one with the blinking blue LEDs that you can find in most car parks  (which turns out to be iRoad cams) but ended up getting this Thinkware F750 instead.

Hardware:

  • 1080p Full HD 2 channel (front + back) recording at 30 frames per second
  • Auto image correction (Wide Dynamic Range, Super Night Vision, Smart Auto Exposure)
  • Sony Exmor CMOS image sensor
  • 140 degrees wide angle view
  • Anti-vibration mounting
  • Thermal self-protection
  • Built-in WiFI, GPS
  • Customisable LED security light

Software:

  • Noise Reduction System
  • Adaptive Colour & Contrast Enhancement
  • Active Impact Monitoring System with 3 axis G-sensor
  • Various recording modes – Continuous Recording, Incident Recording, Parking Surveillance, Manual Recording
  • “Safety” features such as Lane Departure Warning, Front Collision Warning, Safety Camera Warning
  • Dual save – saves videos in both internal memory and microSD card to ensure data integrity

What I like about it:

  • Good quality videos across all light levels (day/night/tunnels/car parks, etc.) – it captures quite a bit of reflection from my dashboard though.
  • Reminder to format microSD card is useful to mitigate memory card issues

What I don’t like about it:

  • Don’t have any illusions that your car now has the fancy safety features that luxury cars have. The Lane Departure Warning System (LDWS) and FCW (Front Collision Warning) are gimmicks that you will surely want to turn off after your first ride.
  • I had the heavy door of a lorry hit the fender of my car. The camera didn’t capture it either through motion or impact detection… Perhaps it is a matter of getting the sensitivity settings right but it irked me that it didn’t work when I needed it to.
  • The hassle of turning on the wifi mode, connecting to the wifi network from your smartphone, launching the app to access the videos is a bit too much for me. Perhaps I was spoilt by my first dashcam that has its own video display.
  • Parking monitoring is up to 48 hours, max. This depends on your memory card and car battery level. For me, it seems to stop after just a few hours. So don’t expect this to watch over your car when you are away for a trip.
  • Due to the simple fact that there is no integration with the car security system, every door you open/close at the start and end of each journey will be reported as an event. Rather annoying.
  • The welcome message which reports the number of events captured since the last shutdown cannot be turned off. Turning the volume down to zero doesn’t do anything as well.

Service:

Well, the installation is free. Call ahead for an appointment at the appointed workshop, of which you have a list to choose from. That said, only one option (ZMC itself) is free; pay $70 for the rest)… I headed there, waited for 15 mins and the sole installer got going with it. He did a prompt job but when I was informed the job is done, I realised that the old camera was not removed. That was eventually removed but not till I waited about 30 minutes for him to be available to do so.

TL;DR:

The F750 does what it should, but perhaps more than what it should. Without integration to a car’s security system, there will always be false positives, and you will eventually ignore the voice reports that you will have to bear with each time you start the car. With no built-in screen to quickly review videos, it can be quite a hassle to do so via the smartphone.

Tip!

I forgot the password for some reason and took me a while to figure out how to do a full reset without looking at the manual. Press REC and FORMAT till you hear 3 beeps. The password will then be changed back to 123456789.


 

Paid: SGD568 – includes front and rear cams, 16GB microSD card and installation
Bought from:  
ZMC Automotive through IT Show offer

Useful links:
User guide: Original | Mirror  | Originating page (also contains PC viewer, firmware, speed cam data)

 

Bellroy’s dynamic product images

bellroy-dynamic-currenciesWhile browsing the Bellroy website, I noticed that the currency featured was SGD. I was curious if the currency shown is based on the visitor’s IP address. So I switched my VPN to Japan and yup, the product image (and price too!) switched to Japanese Yen. The coins don’t change though. But still, nice implementation.

Product image compiled from this product page.

It has been a while…

So it has been some 579 days since my last post.

I have this really bad habit of creating draft posts but never completing them. Since my passion is all things tech, the last drafts include my thoughts on the DS213+, what I deem to be my best tech purchase to date, a review of the Xperia Z3 Compact – my first Android after a long time, and a few other random posts. Perhaps I will get to it in a bit. But right now, my latest acquisition of the Fujifilm X100T has got me all excited about writing about it. How it has reignited my passion for photography after a long time with system/interchangeable lens cameras. So… yeah, perhaps wait for it? 🙂

Papers, Please

Papers, Please

Wifey and I are really enjoying this game.

This game is avail on Mac and Windows for just $9.99. I think it could be a nice game on the iPad too. Anyway, the gameplay is like this. You are an immigrations inspector for fictional Arstotzka. You get to your little booth everyday and process a seemingly endless line of people. In story mode, each day you start with a little brief. Foreigners are welcome today, perhaps not tomorrow. Another day, they may need entry permits. You gotta check EVERYTHING! Name matching entry permit? Photos look right? Expiry dates of permits and passports (ps it’s 1982 not 2013). Names mismatch? Interrogate them. Ink them and compare fingerprints. Found a pimp? Detain him. And oh, don’t forget  the often missed seals, issuing authority and such. Augh! These guys have a tough job! And… you can’t take your time too. Leave too late and you don’t get your pay. You even get to decide if you wanna skip paying rent or for heat, in order to save some money. And face the consequences if your family gets sick as a result of the heat getting turned off.

I love its pixel art, simple yet engaging gameplay that really gets me into the mind of an immigrations officer. Enough said. Go buy it. You can download a free beta, if you must, at http://dukope.com/#ppl.

Immigration checkpoints will never be the same again. 🙂

And here’s the official trailer.

Tagged ,

ThinEdge iPhone 5 bumper case (clear) review

ThinEdge Clear Bumper for iPhone 5

I was browsing online one fine day and saw the Caze ThinEdge bumper for iPhone 5 and thought that it looks nice. So I ordered this off eBay and a week later or so, it arrived in my mailbox.

First thing I felt when I took the bumper out of its packaging? This is it? A flimsy thin frame of clear plastic? Well I gave it a go and snapped it on. And used it for the day. Before the end of the day, I have taken it out and thinking of throwing it away already. Why so?

It’s flimsy. Oh I said that already.

Worse yet, the fastener doesn’t even work well. It will come apart just with the simple action of removing the iPhone from my jeans pocket.

The fastener that doesn't work

Like so.

Anyway the package also included some extras such as screen and back protectors, cleaning cloth and a strange cheap looking plastic sheet that you can bend to use it as a stand. Right…

Other reviews are mostly good with adjectives such as WOW. EXCELLENT. Really? But note that those reviews seem to be for the black/coloured ones which has a matt finish and possibly a better product altogether. Given that the clear option is priced the same, one would expect the same quality though. Or at least pay less for it?

So enough bytes wasted on this product already. To pay £22 for something that won’t even hold itself together is just not worth it.

Tagged , , ,